About Dr. Irina Angel

Board Certified in Adult, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Irina Angel, MD is a physician practicing in Boston since 2001. In September 2017, Dr. Angel joins Cambridge Eating Disorder Center as Medical Director, aiming to optimize support and care delivery for people affected by eating disorders.

Dr. Angel has held administrative, clinical, educational, and leadership roles at various psychiatric facilities in Greater Boston. She served as Medical Director of the Cambridge Youth Guidance Center; Attending Psychiatrist of the Eating Disorders Partial Hospitalization Program at the Boston Center; Psychiatric Emergency Service staff psychiatrist at Cambridge Hospital; staff psychiatrist at Harvard Vanguard Medical Associates among others.

Dr. Angel received her Medical Degree in Pediatrics through a 6-year accelerated bio-medical program at the Russian National Research Medical University. She completed her residency at the University of Pennsylvania and fellowship at Boston Children’s Hospital.

Among a number of distinguished honors, Dr. Angel has received exemplary performance recognition in the Press Ganey/CG-CAHPS patient’s survey in March 2014.

Dr. Angel completed an in-depth research project on clinical and social predictors of schizophrenia. She studied the neuro-biological effects of early experience in children raised in orphanages in Moscow at the Laboratory of Infant Mental Health through the Research Academic Institute of Preventive Psychiatry in Moscow. She has had 6 publications following the results of research studies. Her current interests include neuro-immunology and genetic-environmental interplay, and a growing interest in developmental epigenomics and translational research.

She understands the broader needs of people affected by neuro-psychiatric disorders, the central role of including the patient’s perspectives and experiences in their recovery and rehabilitation. Dr. Angel understands that our children’s health is our nation’s legacy. Dr. Angel has a steadfast commitment to work towards making positive changes in the healthcare system through education, interdisciplinary collaborative work and advocacy.

Mission Statement

As a physician working primarily with children for more than two decades, I fully understand that children’s health is more than just a medical issue. I feel privileged to be a doctor and, at the same time, I feel a deep sense of responsibility to work towards making a better health care system for this vulnerable part of our population.

There is drastic shortage of child psychiatrists for our nation’s 75 million children and teens. Currently there are only 8,300 child psychiatrists nationwide, some 30,000 short of what is needed. In Massachusetts, waits of four to six weeks for a child psychiatry appointment are common, and several community mental health centers report three month waits.

The American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry (AACAP) has worked hard to make the government aware of the crisis of limited access to child psychiatrists. I was inspired by AACAP’s legislative program to get involved in persuading policymakers to address the shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists.

In the spirit of doing my part to address the crisis in access, I have also signed up to volunteer with the National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics to provide free care to homeless women and chidren in greater Boston area and I have created my website as a place where stakeholders can interact and come together on behalf of our children.

Speaking Engagements

As a way to promote the prevention of children’s emotional and behavioral problems, I would like to collaborate with any interested primary care pediatricians by offering informal talks on a variety of topics. Examples include topics on child discipline, coping with bad news, transition to school, the latchkey child, and lying, among others. Please submit a request on your topic of interest. This service will become available in fall 2016.